Big Island Car Rental

Big Island - Points of interest

Hawaii, commonly called the Big Island, is the largest island in the Hawaiian archipelago in the Central Pacific. Its diverse terrain spans colored-sand beaches at Papakolea (green) and Punalu’u (black) to lush rainforest and, within Volcanoes National Park, 2 active volcanoes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa. Hapuna Beach and Kahaluu Beach Park in the west are known for snorkeling and water sports.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, established in 1916, is a United States National Park located in the U.S. State of Hawaiʻi on the island of Hawaiʻi.

Link to Volcanoes National Park.

Mauna Kea
Mauna Kea

Mauna Kea is a dormant volcano on the island of Hawaii. Standing 4,205 m above sea level, its peak is the highest point in the U.S. state of Hawaii.

Rainbow Falls
Rainbow Falls

Rainbow Falls is a waterfall located in Hilo, Hawaii. It is 80 ft tall and almost 100 ft in diameter. The falls are part of the Hawai'i State Parks. There is no fee to see the falls.

Rainbow Falls State Park
Rainbow Falls State Park
Liliuokalani Park and Gardens
Liliuokalani Park and Gardens

Liliʻuokalani Park and Gardens is a 30-acre park with Japanese gardens, located on Banyan Drive in Hilo on the island of Hawaiʻi.

Waipio Valley
Waipio Valley

Waipiʻo Valley is a valley located in the Hamakua District of the Big Island of Hawaiʻi. "Waipiʻo" means "curved water" in the Hawaiian language. It was the capital and permanent residence of many early Hawaiian aliʻi up until the time of King ʻUmi.

Pacific Tsunami Center
Pacific Tsunami Center

The Pacific Tsunami Museum is a museum in Hilo, Hawaii dedicated to the history of the April 1, 1946 Pacific tsunami and the May 23, 1960 Chilean tsunami which devastated much of the east coast of the Big Island, especially Hilo.

Lava Tree State Park
Lava Tree State Park

Lava Tree State Monument is a public park located 2.7 miles southeast of Pāhoa in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. It preserves lava molds of the tree trunks that were formed when a lava flow swept through a forested area in 1790.